Our Book of Remembrance

We wish to celebrate the lives of all those who have been an integral part of the SMG family.  Whether as students, tutors or members of our staff and board, we are grateful for all they did for us and join with you all in mourning their passing.

We invite you all to leave a comment, a note of remembrance, for Simon below:

Simon Cooper

As we can’t meet in person to remember Simon we’ve set up this page where you can leave memories and stories. You can also respond to other comments.

We’re very sad to hear of the recent passing of Simon Cooper. Simon had attended mixed instrument groups with SMG for several years. He was an accomplished and thoughtful musician who was always quietly supportive of class activities, but every so often his sense of humour and fun would emerge. We knew Simon as a concertina player, but as you can see from the photo he had a wider musical career. We send our condolences to his family and friends.
 

Please note that to avoid spam we have to approve each comment before it will come up on the page, so there may be a delay before you can see your comment. If you wish to include a photo please email it to info@scotsmusic.org and it will be uploaded.

3 Comments

  1. SMG folk will remember Simon as playing anglo concertina or latterly mandolin. But starting from 1960’s student days, his main instrument was melodeon (along with guitars and sundry English concertinas). I first knew him as the driving force of his ceilidh band ‘Hopscotch’ playing the melodeon, or the ‘Phil Spectre Wall of Sound’ as we called it. In the mid ’80’S I joined Hopscotch as the token hammer dulcimer player. We made a demo tape – our audition to be one of the resident ceilidh bands at Sidmouth Folk Festival in 1990 – which they accepted. Listening to it now, after a gap of many years – I can’t believe how fast we played..! I’m thankful for over 30 years of music, love and companionship. RIP Simon. Carole xxx

    Reply
  2. Just to add to the more formal bit I wrote for the top of the page…I’m sorry I didn’t know more about Simon’s pre-SMG exploits – one of the downsides of having a big class! But it was always a pleasure to have him as part of the group, and my thoughts are with all the good friends he had at SMG. Sarah x

    Reply
  3. I remember Simon as a man of dry but perceptive wit. A stimulating companion.
    My sincere condolences.

    Reply

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Simon Cooper playing accordion